MCQ Questions with Answers for Class 12, 11, 10, 9, 8, 7, 6, 5, 4, 3, 2, and 1 all Subjects

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English Grammar for Class 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11 and 12

English Grammar for Class 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11 and 12

English Grammar for Class 12 English Writing Skills

CBSE Class 12 English Reading Comprehension Passages/Unseen Passages Passages

English Grammar for Class 11 Speaking and Listening Skills

  • Listening
  • Speaking

CBSE Class 11 English Reading Comprehension/Unseen Passages Passages

CBSE Class 11 English Writing

English Grammar for Class 11

English Grammar for Class 10 Reading, Writing

CBSE Class 10 English Reading

CBSE Class 10 English Writing

CBSE Class 10 English Grammar

English Grammar for Class 9 Writing

CBSE Class 9 English Writing

CBSE Class 9 English Grammar

Elementary English Grammar and Composition for Class 8 Answers

CBSE Class 8 English Comprehension Reading

CBSE Class 8 English Writing

CBSE Class 8 English Grammar

English Grammar for Class 7 Reading, Writing

CBSE Class 7 English Reading

CBSE Class 7 English Writing

CBSE Class 7 English Grammar

English Grammar for Class 6 Reading, Writing

CBSE Class 6 English Reading

CBSE Class 6 English Writing

CBSE Class 6 English Grammar

Memories of Childhood Important Questions CBSE Class 12 English

Memories of Childhood Important Questions CBSE Class 12 English

Short Answer Type Questions (3 Marks, 30-40 words)

Questopn.1. Why was Zitkala-Sa in tears on the first day in the land of apples? (All India 2014)
Answer. Zitkala-Sa was in tears on the first day in the land of apples because she was forced to part with her heavy, long hair. To avoid it, she even hid herself under the bed but she was soon found out and tied fast to her chair. She cried in protest but it all went in vain and she felt the blades of the scissors against her neck and heard them gnaw off her thick braids.

Questopn.2. What comic incident did Bama narrate to her brother? Why was he not amused?
(Foreign 2014)
Answer. While walking back home from school, Bama saw an elder of her street walking towards the landlord, carrying a food packed by its strings without touching it. This made her shriek with laughter. When she narrated the incident to her brother, he was not amused and told her that people of their caste were considered untouchables and that is why the elder carried the packet by its string.

Questopn.3. Which words of her brother made a deep impression on Bama? (Delhi 2014)
Answer. Bama’s brother had told her that because they were born in a particular caste, they were stripped off all honour and dignity. For them, the only way to get their due respect was to make progress by studying hard. Bama took her brother’s words very seriously and excelled in academics to stan^first in her class.

Questopn.4. What is common between Zitkala-Sa and Bama? (Compartment 2014)
Answer. Both Zitkala-Sa and Bama had experienced discrimination in their childhood. While Zitkala-Sa had been a victim of oppression at the hands of the whites in her boarding school, Bama felt and experienced untouchability early in life for being born a ‘dalit’,

Questopn.5. What sort of shows or entertainment attracted Bama? (All India 2013)
or
Which activities of the people would Bama watch keenly in the bazaar?
or
Which actions of the people would Bama watch keenly in the bazaar? (Foreign 2011)
Answer. The bazaar on the way home was always buzzing with activities. The snake charmer, street plays, puppet shows and stunt performances were a few interesting things going on there.
Bama used to love all these things.

Questopn.6. What were the articles in the stalls and shops that fascinated Bama on her way back
from school? (All India 2013)
Answer. On her way back from school, Bama witnessed a variety of interesting things which fascinated her. She saw the dried fish stall, the sweet stall and the stall selling fried snacks. Then there were wild lemurs, needles, clay beads and instruments for cleaning out the ears on sale. She loved to watch the waiters cool the coffee and the chopping up of onions.

Questopn.7. What did Zitkala-Sa feel when her long hair was cut? (Delhi 2011)
Answer. When her long hair was cut, Zitkala-Sa felt anguished and pained. She thought that she was a wooden puppet who had been tossed about in the air. She was really distressed by the fact that nobody came to comfort her like her mother did. She missed her mother very much and felt like an animal driven by a herder.

Questopn.8. What was the advice that Annan gave to Bama? Did she follow it? (All India 2011)
Answer. Annan told Bama that because they were born in a particular community, they were stripped of all honour, dignity or respect. The only way to get all this back was to study hard and make progress. Annan told Bama that education was the key to acceptance by the society so she must learn her lessons really well. Yes, Bama paid heed to his advice and stood first in her class.

Questopn.9. “I felt like sinking tcffhe floor,” says Zitkala-Sa. When did she feel so and why?
(All India 2011)
Answer. When Zitkala-Sa’s shawl was removed from her shoulders, she felt very embarrassed due to her c.linging dress. That was when she felt like sinking to the floor. She considered herself as one of the little animals driven by a herder.

Questopn.10.What did Judewin tell Zitkala-Sa? How did she react to it? (All India 2011)
Answer. The hostel authorities were going to cut the long hair of girls. Wearing short hair was against Zitkala-Sa’s culture. Judewin told her that they would have to submit, for they could not fight the strong authorities. However, Zitkala-Sa disagreed and decided to put up a fight and resist it.

Questopn.11.What does Zitkala-Sa remember about the first day in the land of apples? (Foreign 2011)
Answer. the first day in the Ian8 of apples was a ‘bitter-cold one’ firstly because the snow still covered the ground and the trees were bare. Secondly, die atmosphere of the school was not at all cordial. It was dictatorial and regimental. The author did not understand the language spoken there or the cuiture followed.
She detested the way in which even the day to day activities like eating and dressing up were done ‘by formula’. Even the teachers seemed to be ruthless.

Questopn.12.Why was Zitkala-Sa so averse to having her hair cut ? (Foreign 2011)
Answer. Zitkala-Sa did not wish to get her hair cut because her mother’s words were deeply embedded in her mind. Her mother had told her that only the hair of prisoners of war was shingled by captors. In their culture, short hair was worn by mourners and shingled hair by cowards.

Questopn.13.Why did the landlord’s man ask Bama’s brother on which street he lived? What was
the significance? (Delhi 2010)
Answer. One day, when Annan was returning home from the library, one of the landlord’s men approached him and asked him his name. Thereafter the man asked him in which street he lived. He specifically asked this question because it was aimed at finding out his caste. Annan narrated this incident to Bama to let her know the indignity and humiliation their community had to suffer.

Questopn.14.Why was Zitkala-Sa terrified when Judewin told her that her hair would be cut short?
(All India 2010)
Answer. Zitkala-Sa is an American Indian. In her culture, short hair is worn by mourners. As it is, she was disturbed and embarrassed by the rooms of the school. She got all the more terrified when Judewin told her that her hair would be cut short.

Questopn.15.Why did Bama take thirty minutes walking home from school when she could have
covered the distance in ten minutes? (All India 2009)
Answer. On her way back from school, Bama got attracted by the little trivialities on the street. The buzzing market, the snake charmers, the lemurs in cages etc., all caught her attention. Thus, it took Bama thirty minutes to return from school, when she could have covered this distance in ten minutes.

Questopn.16.When did Bama first come to know of the social discrimination faced by the people of
her community? “(Delhi 2009)
Answer. Bama was a Tamil Indian belonging to the dalit community. She first came to know about the social discrimination faced by the people of her community when she was a student of class three. She saw, on her way back from school, an elderly man carrying a small packet containing some eatables by a string without touching it.
She found it very funny but was shocked to know from her brother that since that bag was for the landlord, it was not to be touched by the dalit who was carrying it. Thus it was carried in such a manner.

Questopn.17.How did Zitkala-Sa try to prevent the shingling of her hair? (Delhi 2009)
Answer. To escape from her hair being cut, Zitkala-Sa crept upstairs unnoticed. She entered a large room and crawled under the bed in the dark. However, she was ultimately found, was dragged out, carried downstairs and tied to a chair. Finally, despite her fierce resistance, her long braid were chopped off.

Questopn.18.Describe the experience Bama had on her way back home which made her feel sad.
(Foreign 2009)
Answer. One day, when Bama was on her way back home, she saw that an elder of ‘her street’ was carrying a small packet of vadai or green banana bhajji. He was holding the packet by its string without touching it. This was because he was an untouchable and his touch would have rendered it unfit for the consumption of the upper caste landlord.
This experience made her feel sad because the incident portrayed that from the beginning, our society has been divided on rigid caste lines. The lower castes have suffered untold miseries and humiliations by the upper caste people.

Long Answer Type Questions (6 Marks, 120-150 words)

Questopn.19.What activities did Bama witness on her way back from school? (Compartment 2014)
Answer. Bama’s home was a ten-minute walking distance from her school but it usually -took her from half an hour to an hour to reach. On her way back, many activities and sights caught her attention.
Bama got attracted to many novelties and oddities on the street like the performing monkey, the snake charmer’s snake, the wild lemur in a cage, the cyclist and spinning wheels, the Maariyaata temple and its huge bell, etc. She also noticed the pongal offerings being cooked in front of the temple. There was a dried fish stall near the statue of Gandhiji. There was a sweet stall and a stall selling fried snacks.
Puppet shows, street plays, public meetings of political parties were other entertaining activities. She would see the waiters pouring coffee and vendors chopping onions. She admired the various fruits that flooded the market according to the seasons.

Questopn.20.What are the similarities in the lives of Bama and Zitkala-Sa though they belong to
different cultures? (All India 2009)
Answer. Bama and Zitkala-Sa belong to different cultures. But both have experienced oppression and discrimination in their childhood.
Bama was born a ‘dalit’ and was upset to see the humiliations borne by the members of her community. They were considered untouchables, were made to live apart, run errands and bow humbly to people of the upper castes.
On the other hand, Zitkala-Sa was a victim of severe prejudice that prevailed against the native Americans. In the boarding school, her blanket was forcibly taken off her shoulders. At the same time, the forced cutting of her long hair only made her feel like a defeated warrior, for in her culture, short hair was only worn by mourners.
Thus, both Bama and* Zitkala-Sa have suffered as young members of marginalised communities.

Questopn.21.What oppression and discrimination did Zitkala-Sa and Bama experience during their childhood? How did they respond to their respective situations? (All India 2008)
Answer. Zitkala-Sa was a native American who was forcibly sent to a Christian school. She resisted the strict regimentation of the school. She hated cutting of her hair because in her culture short hair is worn by mourners. When her friend Judewin told her that they would have to give in, she disagreed and decided to fight against it.
Bama, on the other hand, belonged to a marginalised, untouchable community. She was upset to know the discriminatory treatment meted out to the members of her community. She was infuriated at this inhuman practice of casteism.
Both Zitkala-Sa and Bama refused to accept any type of oppression, exploitation or victimisation. Zitkala-Sa throughout her career as a writer criticised dogma and dedicated her entire life to fight against tryanny and oppression. Bama became a Tamil dalit writer and ushered a newness and freshness in her writings. Both of them tried to shed light on the atrocities committed by the oppressors on the hitherto marginalised communities.

Important Questions for Class 12 English

Evans Tries an O-level Important Questions CBSE Class 12 English

Evans Tries an O-level Important Questions CBSE Class 12 English

Short Answer Type Questions (3 Marks, 30-40 words)

Qluestion.1.What kind of person was Evans? Why did he want to sit for the O-level German
examination? (Compartment 2014)
Answer. Evans was a young prisoner who had tried to escape thrice from the prison. For this reason, he was also known as ‘Evans the Break’. He seemed to be quite a pleasant and astute person, but he was basically a kleptomaniac. His desire to sit for the O-level German examination was only a plot to hoodwink the authorities and escape from the prison.

Question.2.What were the contents of the small suitcase that McLeery carried? (Delhi 2012)
Answer. The suitcase that McLeery carried had a sealed question paper envelope, a yellow invigilation form, a special authentication card from the Examination Board, a paper knife, a Bible, the current copy of the Church Times and a small semi-inflated rubber ring.

Question.3.What were the precautions taken for the smooth conduct of the examination? ‘
(Delhi 2011)
Answer. The prison authorities had taken elaborate precautions to ensure the smooth conduct of the examination. Evans’ cell was thoroughly frisked a night before. All sharp edged objects like razor, scissors, etc., were taken away. Even the suitcase of the invigilator was carefully checked and the prison officers kept a close watch on him (Evans) throughout the process.

Question.4.How did the Governor react to the two phone calls he received in quick succession?
(All India 2011)
Answer. The Governor had a sharp presence of mind and wanted to give Evans no chance to escape. As a part of his multi-step elaborate precautions, he verified the first phone call he received. However, he did not do so with (fie second call as he thought he was being paranoid and that he had taken all possible precautions for the safe conduct of the examination.

Question.5. How did the question paper and the correction slip help the prisoner and the
Governor? (Delhi 2010)
Answer. The purpose of the cleverly superimposed photocopied sheet on the question paper and the correction slip was to finalise the details of the plan of escape. This information had to reach Evans. It was also meant to make the authorities believe that the wounded man was McLeery himself. The question paper and correction slip helped the Governor to locate the place where Evans was hiding. Thus, the two clues helped both the prisoner and the Governor.

Question.6. Why did Evans not take off his hat when Jackson ordered him to do so? (All India 2010)
Answer. Evans knew that the duplicate McLeery, who was to invigilate during the O-level German examination, had short hair. So he cropped his hair to pass off as McLeery later. The “bobble hat was an important part of the plan to conceal Evans” cropped hair.

Question.7. How does McLeery explain the presence of a small semi-inflated rubber ring? What
did it actually contain? (All India 2010)
Answer. McLeery tells Jackson that he is suffering from haemorrhoids (piles) and the ring helps him when he has to sit for a long time. In reality, the ring contained pig blood, which Evans would splatter on his head and escape from the hospital as McLeery who had been injured.

Question.8. What clues did the answer sheet of Evans provide to the Governor? (Delhi 2009)
Answer. The index number 313 and the centre number 271 on the answer sheet proved to be the clues for the Governor. Putting the two together and with the help of the Ordnance Survey Map for Oxfordshire, he managed to catch Evans in the hotel.

Question.9. How did Evans outwit the Governor in the end? (Foreign 2009)
Answer. Evans was recaptured by the Governor and handcuffed by a prison officer. He was given farewell by the Governor, who thought he was sending Evans back to Oxford jail. Ironically, it was not so. The prison officer, who was actually a friend of Evans in disguise, took Evans to the police van and unlocked the handcuffs as soon as the Governor was out of sight. Evans finally escaped to Newbury. Thus, Evans outwitted the Governor and had the last laugh in this case.

Long Answer Type Questions (6 Marks, 120-150 Words)

Question. 10. Describe the precautions taken by the prison officers to prevent Evans from
escaping. (Delhi 2014)
or
What precautions were taken by the prison authorities for the smooth conduct of the examination? (Compartment 2014)
Answer. As Evans had tried to escape before, the prison authorities had taken all possible precautions for the smooth conduct of the examination.
Evans’ cell was thoroughly frisked a night before and all sharp-edged objects like razor, nail-file, scissors, etc., were taken away from him. The suitcase of the invigilator McLeery was carefully checked. Also, the Governor had himself decided to supervise the examination by listening in through the microphone connected to Evans’ cell. Prison officer Stephens was deployed to observe Evans from the peep-hole every minute or so. Another prison officer Mr Jackson was in constant contact with the Governor on the phone. Both the gates of the wings of Evans’cell were locked tightly.
Thus the authorities left no stone unturned in ensuring the smooth and safe conduct of the examination.

Question.11.How did the negligence of the prison officers prove to be a boon for Evans? (Foreign 2014)
Answer. The prison authorities had taken multi-step detailed precautions for the safe conduct of the examination. However, some lapses on their part at critical moments proved to be a boon for Evans.
First of all, no one tried to verify the identity of the invigilator McLeery and that turned out to be a key mistake in this case. Similarly, the identities of the van driver and the officer who handcuffed Evans were not verified. All of them later turned out to be Evans’ accomplices. The Detective Superintendent also acted hastily and did not drive the injured McLeery to the hospital. This gave Evans the chance to escape. Finally, the Governor, who had a sharp presence of mind and hawk-eyed vigil, made the greatest blunder. When he nabbed Evans at the hotel, he did not bring him to the jail with himself and sent him with a driver and ‘silent’ prison officer. Thus, Evans escaped yet again.

Question.12.Give a character sketch of the Governor of Oxford Prison based on your
understanding of the story, ‘Evans Tries an O-level’. (All India 2013)
Answer. The Governor of the HM Prison, Oxford, appears to be kind-hearted fellow at the start as he arranges for on O-level exam for a prisoner renowned for his ability to escape. He was, though, quite skeptical of Evans and made every arrangement to make sure that Evans had no means to escape.
He was also very proud and self-conscious. He did not want Evans to disgrace him by escaping from his prison. He had a sharp presence of mind, which was clear from the fact that he cross checked every call that was made to the prison that day.
However, he got over-confident of his arrangements and gave Evans the opportunity to escape.
Also, he was a person who did not mind showering praise on a prisoner. When Evans revealed the secret plan to him, he admired him.
At last, he proved to be just another good-for-a-giggle, gullible Governor when again Evans tricked him and successfully escaped. His overconfidence and self-praise let him down.

Question.13.How was the injured McLeery able to befool the prison officers? (All India 2012)
Answer. Evans acted really well as the ‘injured’ McLeery. The fake blood that was supplied to him by his invigilator friend was pouring down from his head. With a ‘feeble’ hand, he got his handkerchief and held it to his bleeding head. In fact in that process, he was able to hide his face from the eyes of the prison officer. He was in so much pain that he could hardly utter a coherrent word! In this way, he concealed his voice and was able to dodge the officers. The moment he heard the suggestion of bringing in an ambulance, he interrupted and asked them to call the policl; he offered them his help in tracing Evans whom the authorities thought had escaped. This was a part of his plan in which all officers were trapped.
Evans acting as the injured McLeery fooled all the officers and he became successful in making them believe that the injured invigilator was really trying to help them. Thus, by his superb acting of an injured person, he was completely successful in befooling and confusing the prison officers.

Question.14. What purpose did the question paper and the correction slip serve? How did they
help both the criminals and the Governor? (All India 2012)
Answer. The purpose of the photocopied sheet that was superimposed on the question paper and the correction slip was to supply the details of the plan of escape to Evans without uttering a single word. It was a well-thought out meticulous plan. It was also meant to make the authorities believe that the wounded man was McLeery himself. And at that moment, it worked as was thought and the authorities got trapped.
However, there is a wise saying ‘iron cuts iron’. Just like that, if that superimposed question paper and correction slip helped Evans, then the same materials helped the Governor also in locating the place where Evans was hiding.
The six digit number of the correction slip, i.e. the index number and centre number 313/271, helped the Governor. He put these numbers together and with the help of the Ordnance Survey Map of Oxfordshire, he reached the hotel where Evans had decided to hide for the day.

Important Questions for Class 12 English

On The Face of It Important Questions CBSE Class 12 English

On The Face of It Important Questions CBSE Class 12 English

Short Answer Type Questions (3 Marks, 30-40 Words)

Question.1. Why did Mr Lamb help Derry? (Compartment 2014)
Answer. Mr Lamb and Derry were both victims of physical impairment or deformity. However, unlike
Derry, who became enr^ittered because of it, Mr Lamb was always full of life. His physical suffering had failed to damper his spirit. Thus, Mr Lamb helped Derry because he wanted him to change his perspective towards life and enjoy every moment of it.

Question.2. In what sense is the friendship between Mr Lamb and Derry fruitful? (Compartment 2014)
Answer. The friendship that flourished between Mr Lamb and Derry was indeed fruitful. Mr Lamb’s unending enthusiasm and unceasing zeal to live life despite all odds helped Derry change his outlook towards life. Derry, who was just carrying on an unhappy existence, was able to see some meaning to his life after meeting Mr Lamb.

Question.3. If you were to give a different ending to the story, ‘On The Face of It’ how would you
end it? (All India 2013)
Answer. The ending of the story, ‘On the face of It’ is very sad as Mr Lamb is probably dead. In my opinion, such a beautiful story should not have such a tragic ending. In the end, Derry should have saved Mr Lamb from falling by holding the ladder at the last moment. This would have given a message of hope.

Question.4. How does Mr Lamb keep himself busy when it is a bit cool? (Delhi 2012)
Answer. Mr Lamb was a person who could survive and enjoy in all circumstances and seasons. When it got cooler, Mr Lamb kept himself busy by breaking the crab apples from the trees in his garden and making jelly from them.

Question.5. Why does Mr Lamb leave his gate always open? (All India 2011)
Answer. Mr Lamb always left his gate open because he did riot mind strangers entering his house or garden. Probably also because he was not afraid of anything.

Question.6. What is the bond that unites the two—Mr Lamb, the old and Derry, the small boy?
How does the old man inspire the little boy? (Foreign 2011)
Answer. It is physical disability in different forms, the empathetic feeling that creates a bond, which unites the old man and Derry. Although both face the same problem, there is a vast difference in the attitude to and perception of the problem.
The old man has an upper hand #n life and experience due to his age, which gives him the zest to inspire the little boy.

Question.7. What qualities of Mr Lamb attracted Derry to him? (All India 2009)
Answer. Mr Lamb was aperson full of life. Sadness or negativity found no place in his world. His physical impairment and people’s humiliating remarks had failed to dampen his spirit. His undying optimism and ever friendly attitude drew Derry towards him. For Derry, Mr Lamb was his source of inspiration.

Question.8. What did Derry’s mother think of Mr Lamb? (All India 2009)
Answer. When Derry informed his mother of Mr Lamb and that he wanted to sit with him, she did not like it. She thought that he was not a good man and she did not want her son to remain in touch with him for any purpose.

Question.9. How does Mr Lamb try to remove the baseless fears of Derry? (All India 2008)
Answer. Mr Lamb tries to remove the baseless fears of Derry by telling him that nothing in this world is so worthless that it deserves to be considered as trash. Even weeds have their own value. He advises Derry to ignore people’s comments and think of beautiful objects. He tells him to hear only those things that are worth hearing. It is attitude that matters.

Long Answer Type Questions (6 Marks, 120-150 words)

Question.10.What is the bond that unites the two—the old Mr Lamb and Derry, the small boy?
How does the old man inspire the small boy? (Delhi 2013)
Answer. Derry, a small boy, had a side of his face burnt as acid had fallen over it. Thus he grew up to be withdrawn arid defiant.
The old Mr Lamb got one of his legs blown off in a war and had a tin leg in place of it. He lived alone, but unlike Derry, he did not let his handicap rule his life.
The physical impairment somehow united the feelings of both of them. But their attitudes to their respective situations were totally different. Mr Lamb came as an angel in the sad life of Derry. He told Derry that beauty is not limited to looks but it is in how you feel from inside. He taught him to enjoy life to the fullest.
Mr Lamb’s encouraging words elevated Derry’s confidence. For the first time in his life, he wanted to live for himself. Thus he was inspired by the old man.

Question.11.The lesson, ‘On the Face of It’ is an apt depiction of the loneliness and sense of
alienation experienced by people on account of a disability. Explain. (VBQ)
Answer. Mr Lamb and Derek both were victims of physical impairment. Mr Lamb had an artificial leg made of tin and Derek had a scared face. Undoubtedly, both had suffered humiliations in life on account of their handicaps.
Derek, however, suffered not only from his handicap but also from low self-esteem, lack of confidence, desolation and withdrawal. He felt that nobody wanted him or loved him. They feared looking at his ugly face.
Looking at Derek’s example, we feel that people with physical impairment need genuine concern. They can perform better than average individuals who do not suffer from any disability, provided they get the right opportunities to prove themselves.

Question.12.Derry and Mr Lamb both are victims of physical impairment but their attitudes
towards life are completely different. Explain. (Delhi 2009)
Answer. Derry, a fourteen year old boy, did not expect anything out of life. A pessimist, he had lost all self-regard and led an isolated existence. He felt unwanted because he had a scared face. Mr Lamb, on the other hand, was full of life. Although he lived alone and had a tin leg, he kept himself busy by tending to his garden, his bees and making toffee and jelly. He welcomed everybody to his house and garden. He enjoyed sitting in the sun, reading books and gardening. Although kids mocked him by calling him ‘Lamey Lamb/ he did not bother about it. He was an apostle of optimism, enthusiasm and hope.
Thus we see that there is a striking contrast between Mr Lamb and Derry.

Question.13.Do you think Derry’s chance meeting with Mr Lamb would prove meaningful to him?
Answer giving valid reasons. (Foreign 2009)
Answer. When Derry met Mr Lamb, he was a fourteen year old boy who had lost all zest for life. He had lost all self-regard and suffered from a terrible inferiority complex due to his scared face. He hated meeting people and remained withdrawn.
After meeting Mr Lamb, Derry was filled with enthusiasm for life. Mr Lamb’s words had a profound effect on him and he changed drastically. He was not overtly conscious of his ugly face any longer. We could get a reflection of Derry’s transformation in Scene two, when he reached his house after a brief encounter with Mr Lamb.
He told his mother, “You shouldn’t believe all you hear.” He categorically told her that he wanted to go back to Mr Lamb to listen to bees singing and him talking.
In the end, he rushed to meet his mentor to keep his promise to the old man. Looking at these developments, one is bound to conclude that Derry hopefully would not become secluded once again. Derek would certainly be confident and happy in the future.

Question.14.How did Mr Lamb’s meeting with Derry become a turning point in Derry’s life?
(Delhi 2008)
Answer. Derry’s brief association with Mr Lamb changed him from a bitter, pessimistic and complex-ridden boy to a mature and confident person. His attitude towards life underwent a transformation.
He got encouraged by Mr Lamb’s unending enthusiasm and unceasing zeal to live life. Thus Mr Lamb’s unfailing optimism helped transform Derek completely. Mr Lamb’s conversation with him about everything and everybody being essentially the same, his notion of beauty being relative, his talk about pretty girls and love, his concept of the world and friendship and the incident of the timid man, all fascinated and inspired Derek.
Gradually, Derek was able to shed his old self and rediscover life. He was able to experience the joy of little things of life like rain drops falling pitter-patter on the roof. He even told his mother, “You shouldn’t believe all you hear.”
Thus, Derek’s brief association with Mr Lamb became a turning point in his life.

Important Questions for Class 12 English

Should Wizard hit Mommy Important Questions CBSE Class 12 English

Should Wizard hit Mommy Important Questions CBSE Class 12 English

Short Answer Type Questions (3 Marks, 30-40 words)

Question.1. Why did Roger Skunk go to see the old owl? (All India 2014)
or
Why did Roger Skunk go to visit the old owl? (Compartment 2014)
Answer. Roger Skunk was unhappy with his bad smell because of which all the woodland creatures would run away from him and no one would play with him. Thus, Roger Skunk went to the old wise owl to seek a sojution for this problem.

Question.2. Why did Jo think that Skunk’s mommy was stupid? (Foreign 2014)
or
How did Jo want the Wizard to behave when mommy Skunk approached him?
(Delhi 2010)
Answer. According to Jo, Roger Skunk was happy with his new smell of roses and should have been allowed to retain it. As a child, Jo related herself to Roger and disapproved of Mother Skunk taking him to the Wizard to get back his old foul smell. Thus, Jo considered the Skunk’s mommy stupid and wanted the Wizard to hit her on her head.

Question.3. How does Jo want the story to end? (Compartment 2014, All India 2012)
or
How did Jo want the story of Roger Skunk to end? (All India 2009)
or
How does Jo want the story to end and why? (Delhi 2008)
Answer. Jo wanted the story to end with the Wizard hitting the mother of Roger Skunk with his magic wand. She disapproved of Mother Skunk taking Roger to the Wizard to get back his old foul smell. According to her, Roger was happy with his new smell of roses and should have been allowed to retain it.

Question.4. Why does Jack insist that it was the Wizard that was hit and not the mother?
(Compartment 2014)
Answer. Jack insisted that it was the Wizard who was hit and not the mother as he wanted to send out a message that parents are the most genuine well-wishers of a child and their decisions are final. He did.not want to give the child the freedom to go against his mother, which he knew would become a wrong precedent.

Question.5. How was the Skunk’s story different from the other stories narrated by Jack?
(Delhi 2014)
Answer. The other stories narrated by Jack would end with the protagonist-some animal named Roger taking the help of the Wizard to solve his problem. However the Skunk’s story ended on a different note, where Roger’s mother took him back to the Wizard and got his smell changed again. Thus, in this regard the Skunk’s story was different from the other stories narrated by Jack.

Question.6. What did Jo want the Wizard to do when Mommy Skunk approached him? (Delhi 2013)
Answer. Roger smelt very bad. Everybody teased him by calling him ‘Stinky Skunk’. Nobody wanted to play with him. The Wizard gave him the smell of roses. He was very happy. But Mother Skunk thought otherwise, went to to the Wizard, hit him on the head and asked him to change back Roger’s smell to what it was earlier.This made Jo very angry. She wanted that the Wizard should hit Mommy Skunk right back on her head for being insensitive to Roger’s problem.

Question.7. Why does Jo insist that her father should tell her the story with a different ending?
(All India 2013)
Answer. Jo, being a child, fails to accept the harsh realities of life. According to her, Roger Skunk was happy with the smell of roses. She did not want him to smell bad. That is why she insisted that her father should le-tell the story wherein the Wizard hits Mommy Skunk and does not change Roger’s smell back.

Question.8. How did the Wizard help Roger Skunk? (Delhi 2012)
Answer. After listening to the misery of Roger Skunk, the Wizard invited him inside his house and with the help of his magic wand made him smell like roses. Roger Skunk was unhappy with his unpleasant smell because of which no other creature played with him. He went to the Wizard to seek a solution for this problem. After listening to his misery, the Wizard invited him in and with the help of his magic wand made him smell like roses.

Question.9. What part of the story did Jack himself enjoy the most and why? (Delhi 2011)
Answer. Jack enjoyed telling the story of a small creature usually named Roger. Every story had a wise old owl and a Wizard with a magic wand, who solved the protagonist’s problem. He particularly enjoyed the part when he changed his voice to that of an old man, imitating the Wizard’s voice.

Question.10. Why was Roger Skunk’s mommy angry? (Foreign 2011)
or
Why was Roger Skunk’s mommy angry with him? What did she finally tell him?
(Delhi 2010)
Answer. When Roger Skunk reached home smelling like roses, his mother was unhappy and asked him about it. When Roger told her the truth, she was annoyed.
She told him that Skunks are born with a particular smell and she wanted him to retain his natural smell. She wanted him to keep his identity intact and not feel humiliated to carry one’s distinct feature with pride and self-regard.

Question.11.Why did Jo think Roger Skunk was better off with the new smell? (Delhi 2010)
Answer. While listening to the story, Jo identified herself with Roger. Since Roger was happy with the new smell, she wanted him to be in the way he was happy. She had an independent viewpoint and^ wanted things according to her outlook.

Question.12.How did the Roger Skunk’s mother get his old smell back? (All India 2008)
Answer. When Roger Skunk reached home smelling like roses, his mother asked him about it. On hearing the truth, she got infuriated and took her baby back to the Wizard and asked him to return his original smell and also hit him on his head. That is how Roger Skunk’s mother got Roger’s old smell back.
Long Answer Type Questions (6 Marks, 120-150 words)

Long Answer Type Questions (6 Marks, 120-150 words)

Question.13.Why is an adult’s perspective on life different from that of a child’s? (All India 2010)
Answer. An adult’s view of life is different from that of a child. It is more realistic, practical and matter-of-fact due to an adult’s myriad experiences in life. In contrast to this, the child views the world with rose-coloured glasses. It is a utopian world untouched by the hard realities of life. Thus, a child’s views is very naive as compared to that of an adult.
Jack, the father in the story “Should Wizard Hit Mommy?” told a story which was similar to one of his own childhood experiences. Through it, he wanted to convey to his daughter Jo that whatever parents say or do for their children is in their best interest. However, Jo thought from the narrow perspective of a child and wanted an ending different from what Jack had narrated.

Question.14.Why did Jo disapprove of back’s ending of the story of Roger Skunk? How did she
want it to end? (Delhi 2009)
Answer. Jo was an avid listener of stories. She was always aware, inquisitive and alert during the story telling sessions. Jo was shocked and surprised by the twist in the version of her father’s story and this was utterly unacceptable to her. She emphasised that the mother was wrong in getting Roger back his original smell. According to her, if her son was being happily accepted by his playmates, he should have been allowed to retain it. As a child, Jo lived in her own beautiful world limited to her friends.
She put herself in place of Roger and wanted an ending different from what Jack had given to the story. Jo believed that Mother Skunk should have been hit by the Wizard for being ‘stupid’ enough to be insensitive to Roger Skunk’s feelings.

Question.15.What impression do you form of Jack as a father?  (Delhi 2009)
Answer. Jack was a father of a small four year old girl, Jo. He was a very loving, caring and an / affectionate father, who used to tell his daughter a story out of his imagination every day. Since his daughter was very inquistive and used to ask many questions, he had to be ready with the answers. He was a good storyteller, but was often found caught in an ugly middle position, when he had no answers to his daughter’s questions.
As a part of good parenting, he tried his level best to prove his point and satisfy his daughter’s queries. To sum up, we can infer that Jack was a very good father, who believed in giving a child the best care and understanding.

Important Questions for Class 12 English

My Mother at Sixty-Six Important Questions CBSE Class 12 English

My Mother at Sixty-Six Important Questions CBSE Class 12 English

Extract Based Questions (4 Marks)

Question.1. Read the extract given below and answer the questions that follow.
I looked again at her, wan, pale
as a late winter’s moon and felt that old
familiar ache, my childhood’s fear,
but all I said was see you soon, Amma,
all I did was smile and smile and smile ……… (Foreign 2014; Modified)
(a) What was the poet’s childhood fear?
(b) What were the poet’s parting words?
(c) What is the poetic device used in these lines?
(d) Why did the poet smile and smile?
Answer. (a) In her childhood, the poet was insecure about losing her mother, just as all young children often are.
(b) The poet’s parting words were, “See you soon, Amma”, which are suggestive of the hope that they will meet again.
(c) The poetic device used in these lines is simile, where the mother’s dull and lifeless face is compared to a late winter’s moon.
(d) The poet smiled and smiled (meaning that she smiled continuously) because she was trying to hide her real feelings. She feared the fact that she might not see her mother again, which left her almost in tears.

Question.2. Read the extracts given below and answer the questions that follow.
……….but soon
put that thought away and
looked out at young
trees sprinting, the merry children spilling
out of their homes……………
(a) What thought did the poet drive away from her mind?
(b) What did she see when she looked out of the car?
(c) How do you know that the joyful scene didn’t help her drive away the painful thought from her mind?
(d) What are the merry children symbolic of? (Compartment 2014; Modified)
or
(a) Which thought did the poet put away?
(b) What do the ‘sprinting trees’ signify?
(c) What are “the merry children spilling out of their homes”, symbolic of?
(d) Why does the poet make use of the images of ‘young trees sprinting’ and ‘merry children spilling’? (Delhi 2014; Modified)
or
(a) Who looked out at the young trees?
(b) Which thought did she put away?
(c) What do young sprinting trees signify?
(d) Why are the trees described as sprinting? (Delhi 2008)
Answer. (a) The poet drove away the painful thought of the distressing reality that her mother was getting old and she might die anytime.
(b) When she looked out of the car, she saw young trees on the roadside, which appeared to be moving. She also saw a group of children, merrily rushing out of their homes to play.
(c) As the poet passed through security check at the airport and happened to look at her mother, she was again haunted by the same fear of losing her to death. This shows that the joyful scene earlier didn’t help drive away the painful thought from her mind.
(d) The merry children are symbolic of the exuberance of youth. The energetic and lively children present a contrast to the poet’s mother who has grown old and pale.
or
Answer. (a) The poet put away the thought of the-distressing reality of her mother getting old and of her impending death.
(b) The ‘sprinting trees’ signify time that has passed at a fast pace.
(c) The merry children epitomise bubbly youth. They represent the exuberance and liveliness of young age.
(d) The poet makes use of these images to emphasise the contrast between old age and youth.
or
Answer. (a) The poet Kamala Das looked out at young trees.
(b) Seeing her aged mother, she felt insecure about the fact that she might be separated from her mother. The poet was also feeling guilty for neglecting her. She wondered if she would see her mother alive next time. However, she soon put these thoughts away.
(c) The young sprinting trees symbolise happiness, strength and vigour which are the characteristics of youth in contrast to the dullness of old age.
(d) As the poet looked outside the window of her moving car, the trees appeared to be moving fast in the opposite direction. So, they are described as sprinting.

Question.3. Read the extract given below and answer the questions that follow.
Driving from my parent’s
home to Cochin last Friday
morning, I saw my mother, beside me
doze, open mouthed, her face ashen like that ‘
of a corpse and realised with pain .
that she was as old as she looked …
(a) Where was the poet driving to?
(b) Why was her mother’s face looking like that of a corpse?
(c) What did the poet notice about her mother?
(d) Why was the realisation painful? (All India 2013; Modified)
Answer. (a) The poet was driving to Cochin airport from her parent’s home.
(b) Her mother’s face had lost all its glow and colour. It was nearly lifeless. That is why it was looking like a corpse’s face.
(c) The poet noticed that her mother was sleeping with her mouth open. Her face looked like that of a corpse. She suddenly realised that her mother had become very old.
(d) The realisation that her mother had grown very old was painful because it brought with it the distressing thought that she was also nearing her death, whose cruel hands would separate the poet from her mother.

Question.4. Read the extract given below and answer the questions that follow.
…….and
looked but soon
put that thought away and
looked out at young
trees sprinting,
the merry children spilling
out of their homes,………..
(a) Name the poem and the poet.
(b) What did the poet realise? How did she feel?
(c) What did she do then?
(d) What did she notice in the world outside?
Answer. (a) The name of the poem is ‘My Mother at Sixty-Six’ and the poet is Kamala Das.
(b) The poet realised that her mother was getting old and was nearing her impending death. She felt afraid of losing her mother, the same fear which she used to face in her childhood.
(c) The poet at once turned her face away from the harsh reality and looked out of the window to divert her mind.
(d) The poet.saw green trees sprinting by. She also saw a group of children who were exuberant, enthusiastic and were merrily coming out of their houses.

Question.5. Read the extract given below and answer the questions that follow.
…………….and felt that old
familiar ache, my childhood’s fear,
but all I said was, see you soon, Amma,
all I did was smile and smile and smile
(a) What was the childhood fear that now troubled the poet?
(b) What do the poet’s parting words suggest?
(c) Why did the poet smile and smile?
(d) Explain, “that old familiar ache.” (Delhi 2009; Modified)
Answer. (a) As a child the poet was insecure about losing her mother and the same fear has come again now when her mother has grown old.
(b) The poet, while parting, smiled and said to her mother that she would see her soon. This expression of her suggests that though she was aware that her mother was quite old and weak, yet she could not do anything about it. She could not even communicate her true feelings to her mother.
(c) The poet smiled and smiled only because she wanted to hide her fears from her mother. She was reassuring herself and also her mother that they would meet again.
(d) “That old familiar ache” refers to the agony and pain of separation from her mother that the poet felt in her childhood, as she feared that she might iose her mother.

Short Answer Type Questions (3 Marks, 30-40 Words)

Question.1. How does Kamala Das try to put away the thoughts of her ageing mother? (Delhi 2014; Modified)
Answer. Kamala Das finds the thoughts of her ageing mother very painful and disturbing. It is hard for her to accept the fact of her mother growing old, as it brings back to her mind her childhood fear of losing her mother. She makes a deliberate effort to drive or put away such thoughts by looking out of the moving car, at the trees ‘sprinting’ and the joyful young children rushing out of their homes.

Question.2. What was the poet’s childhood fear? (All India 2014)
or
What were Kamala Das, fears as a child? Why do they surface when she is going to the airport? (All India 2011)
Answer. As a child Kamala Das was insecure about losing her mother just as all young children often are. The same feelings are evoked inside her while she is on the way to the airport, as she sees her mother’s pale face, which is a sign of her old age and impending death.

Question.3. What do the parting words of Kamala Das and her smile signify? (Compartment 2014)
or
What do the parting words of the poet and her smile signify? (All India 2010)
Answer. The poet’s parting words and her smile are a facade to hide her feelings of insecurity. The pale and senile appearance of her mother brings back her childhood fear of losing her mother. She can definitely experience the pangs of separation, yet she bids her farewell in a pleasant manner. She reassures her mother that all will be well and they would meet again.

Question.4. Why has the poet’s mother been compared to the “late winter’s moon”? (Delhi 2013)
or
Why has Kamala Das compared her mother to a “late winter’s moon”? (Foreign 2011)
Answer. The poet has used this simile as ‘the late winter’s moon’ looks too hazy and lacks brightness and lustre. Similarly, the mother, who is now sixty-six, is pale and has a shrunken and ashen face. She is devoid of the effervescence and exhilaration of youth.

Question.5. Why are the young trees described as ‘sprinting’? (Delhi 2012,2010)
Answer. The poet is travelling in a speeding car and the roadside trees seem speeding past or sprinting in the opposite direction. The poet has contrasted the ‘young trees’ which are moving fast to her mother, who is old and slow.

Question.6. What were the poet’s feelings at the airport? How did she hide them? (All India 2012)
Answer. The poet was torn apart by the feeling whether she would see her mother alive the next time or not. She hid her feelings by smiling reassuringly at her mother.

Question.7. What do the parting words of the poet Kamala Das to her mother signify? (All India 2012,2009,2008)
Answer. The parting words of Kamala Das to her mother signify her anxiety and fear about her mother’s frail health. They also express the hope that her mother would survive till they meet again. .

Question.8. Why has the poet brought in the image of the merry children spilling out of their homes? (Foreign 2008)
Answer. The young children spilling out of their homes represent the exuberance and vigour of youth. They are in complete contrast to the poet’s mother. Perhaps the poet has used the image to bring out the pangs of old age.

Important Questions for Class 12 English

An Elementary School Classroom in a Slum Important Questions CBSE Class 12 English

An Elementary School Classroom in a Slum Important Questions CBSE Class 12 English

Extract Based Questions (4 Marks)

Question.1. Read the extract given below and answer the questions that follow.
“ And yet, for these
Children, these windows, not this map, their world,
Where all their future’s pointed with a fog,
A narrow street sealed in with a lead sky Far far from rivers, capes and stars of words.”
(a) Who are the ‘children’ referred to here?
(b) Which is their world?
(c) How is their life different from that of other children?
(d) Why is the future of these children “painted with a fog”?
Answer. (a) The ‘children’ referred to here are the poor children living in the slum.
(b) Their world comprises of the dull and unpleasant classroom and its windows, amongst the dirty surroundings of the slum
(c) The children of the slum are emaciated and poverty-stricken, as against the other children who are healthy and have all the comforts and luxuries of life. The life of the slum children is filled with darkness and hopelessness.
(d) The future of these children is dark and uncertain. So, the speaker says that it is painted with a fog.

Question.2. Read the extract given below and answer the questions that follow.
“ And, yet for these .
children, these windows, not this map. their world,
Where all their future’s painted with a fog.”
(a) Which map is the poet talking about in the above lines?
(b) To what do the words, these windows, their world”, refer?
(c) What sort of future do the slum children have?
(d) Why is all their future painted with a fog?
Answer. (a) The poet is talking about the map which depicts only the world of the rich and the important, the world that comprises civilised domes, bells, flowers and the scenic beauty of nature.
(b) “These windows” refers to the windows of the school classroom where the slum children are sitting.
“Their world” refers to the world of the poverty-stricken slum dwellers. It has narrow lanes, small congested houses, foggy skies and dim classrooms.
(c) The future of the slum children is dark and uncertain. They have no hopes for their future.
(d) Their future is painted with a fog as it is not clear. They are not well-educated, and there is no one to guide them.

Question.3. Read the extract given below and answer the questions that follow.
“With ships and sun and love tempting them to steal….
For lives that slyly turn in their cramped holes From fog to endless night?” (Delhi 2014; Modified)
(a) Who are ‘them’ referred to in the first line? “
(b) What tempts them?
(c) What does the poet say about their lives?
(d) What do you understand by “from fog to endless night”?
Answer. (a) ‘Them’ here refers to the poor, emaciated children of the slum.
(b) They are tempted by all the beautiful things of the world, the luxuries and the lifestyle that the rich enjoy. The are tempted to steal as they cannot possess these otherwise.
(c) The children of the slum live amidst dirty surroundings in cramped houses which are dark and unpleasant. The poet is not happy with the way these children are compelled to live.
(d) “From fog to endless night” means that from morning till night the poor children of the slum have a miserable existence; they suffer from morning to night everyday.

Question.4. Read the extracts given below and answer the questions that follow. ‘
……….The stunted, unlucky heir
of twisted bones, reciting a father’s gnarled disease,
His lesson, from his desk. At the back of the dim class
One unnoted, sweet and young.
(a) Who is the unlucky heir?
(b) What has he inherited?
(c) Who is sitting at the back of the dim class? (AH India 2013; Modified)
(d) Explain, “reciting a father’s gnarled disease.”
or
(a) Who is the ‘unlucky heir’ and what has he inherited?
(b) What is the stunted boy reciting?
(c) Who is sitting at the back of the dim class? (Delhi 2012; Modified)
(d) How has the ‘unlucky heir’ been depicted here?
Answer. (a) The boy with stunted growth and twisted bones is the ‘unlucky heir’.
(b) He has inherited the gnarled disease of his father, and as a result, his growth remains stunted.
(c) An unnoted, sweet young boy is sitting at the back of the dim class. He is dreaming of squirrels playing games on trees.
(d) The boy with stunted growth has inherited a disease from his father, which makes him a living example of his father’s poverty and suffering.
or
(a) The boy with stunted growth and twisted bones sitting at the desk, is referred to as ‘unlucky heir’ because he has inherited the gnarled disease of his father that makes him a living example of his father’s sufferings.
(b) The stunted boy is reciting his lessons, but due to his knotty disease, his voice is weak and sick.
(c) At the back of the dim class, a boy is sitting who has a sweet nature. He is dreaming of
squirrels playing games on trees. ‘
(d) The ‘unlucky heir’ has been depicted here as one with stunted growth and twisted bones.

Question.5. Read the extract given below and answer the questions that follow.
Far far from gusty waves these children’s faces.
Like rootless weeds, the hair torn around their pallor
The tall girl with her weighed-down head. The paper-seeming boy, with rat’s eyes.
(a) What are the children compared to?
(b) Why do you think the tall girl is sitting with a weighed down head?
(c) Give two phrases which tell us that the children are under-nourishedlAll India 2012; Modified]
(d) What is the condition of the boy?
Answer. (a) The children are compared to rootless weeds’.
(b) The girl is sitting with a weighed down head probably because she is depressed due to abject poverty or family tussles.
(c) The phrases are ‘like rootless weeds, and ‘the paper-seeming boy with rat’s eyes’.
(d) The boy sitting in the classroom is as thin as paper, due to malnutrition. He has bulging eyes like that of a rat.

Question.6. Read the extract given below and answer the questions that follow.
Surely, Shakespeare is wicked, the map a bad example,
With ships and sun and love tempting them to steal For lives that slyly turn in their cramped holes From fog to endless night? On their slag heap, these children ‘ Wear skins peeped through by bones and spectacles of steel With mended glass, like bottle bits on stones
(a) Why is Shakespeare described as wicked?
(b) Explain, “from fog to endless night.”
(c) What does the reference to ‘slag heap’ mean?
(d) How do they live in their holes?
Answer. (a) Shakespeare has been described as ‘wicked’ because the children are not aware of his literary genius. In their school, hardly any learning takes place, as they are troubled by hunger, despair and failed aspirations.
(b) With reference to the passage, ‘from fog to endless night’ refers to early morning to late night. It means that every day is the same for the slum children.
(c) The bloodless bodies of the poor children are referred to as ‘slag heap’.
(d) They live like rats in their cramped little holes. Their houses are small, dirty and congested. Fog and darkness dominate their lives.

Question.7. Read the extract given below and answer the questions that follow.
Break O break open till they break the town
And show the children to green fields, and make their world
Run azure on gold sands and let their tongues
Run naked into books the white and green leaves open
History theirs whose language is the sun.
(a) To whom does ‘they’ refer?
(b) What would they break?
(c) What does the poet want for them?
(d) What other freedom should they enjoy? (All India 2011; Modified)
Answer. (a) The word ‘they’ refers to inspectors, visitors, governors and those who are in authority.
(b) They would break the grim walls of the slum children’s world which shut the children off from our world.
(c) The poet wants that these children should be properly educated, so that they get the energy and warmth of the sun which is symbolic of light and knowledge.
(d) The slum children should get adequate opportunity to know the world and find their place under the sun.

Question.8. Read the extract given below and answer the questions that follow.
………On their slag heap, these children
Wear skins peeped through by bones and spectacles of steel With mended glass, like bottle bits on stones.
All of their time and space are foggy slum.
So blot their maps with slums as big as doom.
(a) Which two images are used to describe these slums?
(b) What sort of life do these children lead?
(c) Which figure of speech is used in the last line? (All India 2010; Modified)
(d) What does ‘slag heap’ refer to?
Answer. (a) The images used to describe the slums are ‘foggy slum’ and ‘slums as big as doom’.
(b) The homes of these children are very cramped and dingy. They are almost like holes and these children live in them like rats. They are deprived of the picturesque beauty and gift of nature.
(c) The figure of speech used in the last line is a simile, ‘slums as big as doom’.
(d) ‘Slag heap’ refers to the hunger-stricken bodies of the slum children, which seem to be garbage heaps.

Short Answer Type Questions (3 Marks, 30-40 words)

Question.1. What change does the poet hope for in the lives of the slum children? (Foreign 2014)
or
What does the poet want for the children of the slums? (Foreign 2010)
Answer. The poet wishes for a better life for the children of the slums. They should have access to education because education is the key to prosperity. They should be given countless opportunities to explore the world. They need to break free from the confines of their weak world into a world which should welcome them with open arms. The self-centred attitude of the affluent classes should be broken to relieve the children from all misery.

Question.2. To whom does the poet in the poem, ‘An Elementary School Classroom in a Slum’
make an appeal? What is his appeal? (Compartment 2014; Modified)
Answer. The poet makes an appeal to his readers, especially the educated and well-off people, to help the poor children of the slum come out and get free from their miserable surroundings. His appeal is that these children should be given quality education, because education holds the key to their emancipation.

Question.3. Which words/phrases in the poem, ‘An Elementary School Classroom in a Slum’ show that the slum children are suffering from acute malnutrition?
(Compartment 2014; Modified)
Answer. The words/phrases in the poem which show that the slum children are suffering from acute malnutrition are “the hair torn round their pallor”, “paper seeming boy”, “stunted, unlucky heir of twisted bones” and “wear skins peeped through by bones.”

Question.4. The poet says, “And yet, for these children, these windows, not this map, their world.” Which world do these children belong to? Which world is inaccessible to them?
Answer. The children belong to the world of poverty and misery in the dingy slum areas. The world of the rich, with all the comforts and luxuries of life, is inaccessible to them.

Question.5. How does the poet describe the classroom walls? (Delhi 2010)
Answer. The walls of the classroom are pale and dirty. They are decorated with the donated picture of Shakespeare, a scene depicting buildings with domes, a world map and beautiful valleys, which stand in sharp contrast to the dingy, dismal and gloomy atmosphere in which these slum children live.

Question.6. What message does Stephen Spender convey through the poem, ‘An Elementary School Classroom in a Slum’? (Odd 2013,Foreign 2011)
Answer. The poet wants that the children of the slums should get rid of their dismal lives. They should be educated and brought out from their ugly surroundings. He feels that it is the responsibility of the affluent classes to free these poor children from the life of hunger and misery.

Question.7. Why does Stephen Spender say that the pictures and maps in the elementary school classroom are not meaningful? (Delhi 2009)
Answer. The pictures and maps in the school are meaningless for the slum children because they stand in sharp contrast to the dingy, dismal and gloomy atmosphere in which these slum children live. These things have no meaning for those who are deprived of the basic amenities of life.

Question.8. What does the poet wish for the children of the slums? (Delhi 2008)
Answer. The poet wants that the children of the slums should break free from the rut of their dreary existence. They should experience nature at its best, as well as frolic around in a carefree manner. They should be educated and be able to transform themselves.

Question.9. Why does the poet Stephen Spender call the map a bad example? (All India 200)
Answer. The map represents the beautiful and wonderful world outside. However, this world is beyond the reach of the slum children. Their hopes and aspirations are confined to their world of despair and diseases. So Stephen Spender calls the map a bad example.

Important Questions for Class 12 English